Sunday, 1 October 2017

Modelling videos pt. 2

Two videos by Frédéric Mertès showing various techniques building a Nakajima Ki-84 "Hayate" (Frank) in 1/32. It seems that the hairspray technique works well with large scales. But how about in 1/72. Also, how about the painted hinomaru again in small scales?

Here's the link for the first video:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z8G0y_9NYaI




And here's the link for the second video:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3u_ARpPqZYU

 
Michael Furry
Regarding the hairspray technique, using this method is like anything else in model making, practice, practice practice. I have experimented with this technique a few times and it works quite well, but it can be overdone. I noticed Frederic used silver as the base coat. The silver base coat may be technically accurate, but is not as visually pleasing and often gives the impression of being "over weathered". I often use a darker color when simulating chips and wear as it is more visually pleasing to the eye and is not as apparent as straight silver.
Painting markings works in any scale. The key to painting markings is using very thin paint at low pressure and gradually build up the color, otherwise you can end up with have paint ridges or bleed through. The more color you add the darker the markings and the less color you add, the lighter the markings. You do not need a large quantity of paint to get good coverage. I started to paint markings on models years ago and only use decals when absolutely necessary.
 
Danilo
I use masks as well for painting hinomarus. I use frisket film to make a mask and a slightly modified drawing compass - the pencil end is substituted by a needle whose end has been previously modified with a grinding wheel to obtain a cutting edge. Or, you may use a small blade (by X-Acto?) and adapt it to the compass - of course the blade has to be perfectly sharp.
Using a compass allows to obtain a disc (mask) of very small diameter, which is especially necessary in 1/72 scale.
After that I agree that a bit of practice will give very satisfying results.....
 
Michael Furry
I run a small business with a long time friend producing paint stencils and masks. We use a CAD program to design the images and a plotter cutter to cut the designs. We prefer to use Frisket film because it is clear and positioning the stencil is much easier. We have also successfully designed and cut masks using Tamiya masking tape. Most of our customers prefer Frisket Film since it is clear and quite easy to position. If anyone is interested in paint masks or have questions, please feel free to contact me at: modelstencils@gmail.com
 
Barby jean
All serious modelers own a Silhouette Portrait nowadays, and without knowing how to use special tools like CAD programs, I do my own markings even if sometimes it is tricky. The hairspray technic works in any scale and, as stated above demands practice like any technic in modeling. I use Oramask and I am plenty satisfied with this product, which is the same one used by Montex. Best regards, Jean.

5 comments:

Michael Furry said...

Regarding the hairspray technique, using this method is like anything else in model making, practice, practice practice. I have experimented with this technique a few times and it works quite well, but it can be overdone. I noticed Frederic used silver as the base coat. The silver base coat may be technically accurate, but is not as visually pleasing and often gives the impression of being "over weathered". I often use a darker color when simulating chips and wear as it is more visually pleasing to the eye and is not as apparent as straight silver.

Painting markings works in any scale. The key to painting markings is using very thin paint at low pressure and gradually build up the color, otherwise you can end up with have paint ridges or bleed through. The more color you add the darker the markings and the less color you add, the lighter the markings. You do not need a large quantity of paint to get good coverage. I started to paint markings on models years ago and only use decals when absolutely necessary.

Danilo said...

I use masks as well for painting hinomarus. I use frisket film to make a mask and a slightly modified drawing compass - the pencil end is substituted by a needle whose end has been previously modified with a grinding wheel to obtain a cutting edge. Or, you may use a small blade (by X-Acto?) and adapt it to the compass - of course the blade has to be perfectly sharp.
Using a compass allows to obtain a disc (mask) of very small diameter, which is especially necessary in 1/72 scale.
After that I agree that a bit of practice will give very satisfying results.....

Michael Furry said...

I run a small business with a long time friend producing paint stencils and masks. We use a CAD program to design the images and a plotter cutter to cut the designs. We prefer to use Frisket film because it is clear and positioning the stencil is much easier. We have also successfully designed and cut masks using Tamiya masking tape. Most of our customers prefer Frisket Film since it is clear and quite easy to position. If anyone is interested in paint masks or have questions, please feel free to contact me at: modelstencils@gmail.com

Michael Furry

Barby jean said...

All serious modelers own a Silhouette Portrait nowadays, and without knowing how to use special tools like CAD programs, I do my own markings even if sometimes it is tricky. The hairspray technic works in any scale and, as stated above demands practice like any technic in modeling. I use Oramask and I am plenty satisfied with this product, which is the same one used by Montex. Best regards, Jean.

D. Chouinard said...

I have heard of the Silhouette Portrait, but have never used one. Sounds like something to look into as there are many aircraft kits that either have only one decal option, or the decals are crap anyway. The there are old kits to which there are no aftermarket decals available, so the markings must be painted.
Might be a worthwhile investment....