Arawasi Contest 010

Monday, 23 July 2018

Nakajima Ki-84 "Hayate" (Frank) - Nakajima Ki-115 "Tsurugi - Factory photos

In the previous posting we noticed that at least one, George Bryant noticed that possibly one more "Hayate" did not have anti-glare panels. D. Chouinard asked:  "Did they ever stop painting the anti glare panel at the factory to save time during the finishing process?"
 
Below are most interesting photos of "Hayate" and Nakajima Ki-115 "Tsurugi" I recently discovered HERE. Lovely "Tsurugi" cockpit photo, right?
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Indeed it seems that all the "Hayate" are without anti-glare panel but why are the "Tsurugi" (a suicide a/c) with  one? Note that in the bottom photo the "Tsurugi" in the foreground are painted in "green" camo WITH anti-glare, the "Hayate" without. What's the logic behind that?

Michael Thurow offered some thoughts:
My suggestion: The anti-glare panel was intended to protect pilot's view from reflecting natural metal surfaces. Until introduction of brown-olive camouflage at factory level at the end of 1944 Army planes had either a silver or grey-green factory finish. All dark green paint (solid or in blotches) was depot-applied. The new matte brown colour eliminated the need for additional anti-glare protection.
A similar transition can be observed for IJN aircraft (and in reversed order for USAAF planes).

An afterthought on the camouflaged Tsurugi WITH anti-glare on the last picture. It looks like they were initially intended without camouflage and consequently received an anti-glare area while the Hayate are already built to the latest colour spec. I wouldn't be surprised if the Tsurugi remained silver on the undersides.

Correct Michael but the official instructions called for the brown-olive finished aircraft to have anti-glare. That's why we have the "Hayate" of the 102 Sentai and other units covered before.
I just checked Gakken #46, p.44-45 and the caption says that although not immediately visible the anti-glare is there and was applied to factory a/c until the end of the war. The photo on the lower of p.45 shows anti-glare and if you look very closely at some of the aircraft in the above photos you can barely see the anti-glare on some of them at the very edge of the nose. Curious that it is not that visible.

5 comments:

Michael Thurow said...

My suggestion: The anti-glare panel was intended to protect pilot's view from reflecting natural metal surfaces. Until introduction of brown-olive camouflage at factory level at the end of 1944 Army planes had either a silver or grey-green factory finish. All dark green paint (solid or in blotches) was depot-applied. The new matte brown colour eliminated the need for additional anti-glare protection.
A similar transition can be observed for IJN aircraft (and in reversed order for USAAF planes).

Michael Thurow said...

An afterthought on the camouflaged Tsurugi WITH anti-glare on the last picture. It looks like they were initially intended without camouflage and consequently received an anti-glare area while the Hayate are already built to the latest colour spec. I wouldn't be surprised if the Tsurugi remained silver on the undersides.

Michael thurow said...

Interesting. I hope you don't mind if I come back on this once more. An anti-glare line is possibly visible right in front of the windscreen (not on the nose - that's a panel line).
There are quite a number of pictures of Ki-84 and Ki-43-III that make it very hard to believe there are anti-glare areas (while others clearly show them), and of Ki-100 which are definitely missing them.
Whatever the official directive, ease of manufacturing towards war end may have dictated a less stringent approach.

Arawasi said...

Not a problem Michael, always happy of conversations. Check the close-up I just posted.
Sure, I agree with you on the less strigent approach.

Michael Furry said...

After viewing these photos, I realized that they look a bit familiar. FAOW #3 1985, pg. 22-23 has a set of photos of possibly the same factory. The big difference is that in FAOW #3 all of the aircraft are still on their landing gear. The line up of aircraft is almost identical and the close up shots of the Ki-84 reveals the black anti-glare panel barely visible as in the last photo above.
The Ki-115 photos provide some great inspiration to model an abandoned aircraft.